Home Painting Incredible Sea Waves Captured In 19th Century Russian Paintings

Incredible Sea Waves Captured In 19th Century Russian Paintings

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Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky, a 19th-century painter, created a unique work of art on ships at sea waves. The waves are the best impressive part, light and translucent, about hitting the big ships.

He is a Russian-Armenian painter. That’s not surprising, considering that he is a native of Crimea, born in the port city of Feodosia. During his lifetime, he rose to prominence in Russia and abroad, becoming the first non-French person to receive the Legion of Honor.

Many classic images have captured the sea’s beauty, perhaps no more so than Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky. The way he captures the mighty ocean’s pictures and the humble ship within it perfectly captures the relationship shared with Mother Earth and a man. Productive artists have created more than 6,000 paintings, half of which relate to boats and the sea; Aivazovsky creates more than 3000 marine paints and the ships that inhabit it, inspired by his hometown port of Feodosia in Crimea. The way she captures the sea in all its essence is stunning, with the vibrant colors and details of the waves bringing to life every image, showing the true power of the ocean and the fragility of anyone brave enough to sail.

For more info: artcyclopedia.ru.

#1 The ninth wave. 1850

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

Aivazovsky Ivan Konstantinovich (1817-1900) was born in Feodosia on July 17 (29), 1817, in a family of Armenian businessmen and studied at the Art Academy of Sts. Petersburg under the auspices of M.N. Vorobyov (1833-1839). As a “retired” Academy, he worked in Crimea (1838-1840), Italy (1840-1844), also visiting France, England, and many other countries. He loved traveling later – across Russia, Europe, the Mediterranean – but from 1845, he worked mainly in his hometown. He experienced the French marina’s tremendous influence (sea view) of Baroque-Classicism (K. Lorrain and C. Vernet).

#2 Storm at sea at night. 1849

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

Removing overly dense paintings and too sharp contrasts from classic “backstage” compositions, Aivazovsky finally achieved true picture freedom. The mighty “Ninth Wave” (1850, Russian Museum, St. Petersburg), where he made the impression of “boundless” sea space was achieved, could function as a result of its early period. Providing the effect of a painter, Aivazovsky, who was also a very prolific master, often turns it into a kind of corporate stereotype. But in his most numerous textbooks and well-known drawings (such as “The Black Sea,” 1881, Tretyakov Gallery), he demonstrated his ultimate talent: the ability to exhibit an eternally moving water element absorbed by light.

#3 Shipwreck by the rocks. 1870th

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

A painter of the Main Naval Staff (since 1844), Aivazovsky took part in several military campaigns (including the Crimean War of 1853-1856), creating many paintings of depressing battles (“Battle of Chesme,” 1848, Photo Gallery of Theodosia). Although he performs many “purely mundane” landscapes, among which the prominent Ukrainian and Caucasian landscapes (1850-the 1860s), it is the sea that usually appears to him as the universal basis of nature and history, especially in the subject of creation. World and floods; However, religious, biblical, or evangelical images, iconography, and ancient mythology, cannot be counted among his greatest successes. Aivazovsky devotes several paintings to ancient and modern Armenian history (“JG Byron’s visit to the Mkhitarist monastery near Venice,” 1880, Armenian Art Gallery, Yerevan).

Aivazovsky died in Feodosia on April 19 (2 May 1900). The master’s work is most widely represented in the Feodosia Photo Gallery he founded, which now bears his name.

#4 A ship among the stormy sea

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

#5 The ship Empress Maria during a storm. 1892

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

#6 Stormy sea at night. 1853

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

#7 Shipwreck. 1864

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

#8 Shipwreck. 1843

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

#9 Storm. 1872

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

#10 Shipwreck. 1876

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

#11 A storm off the rocky shores. 1875

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

#12 A storm on the sea on a moonlit night

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

#13 Golden Horn Bay. Turkey. After 1845

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

#14 In the waves. 1893

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

#15 Into the storm. 1872

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

#16 Into the storm. 1899

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

#17 Raging sea

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

#18 Storm 1. 1886

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

#19 Storm 1. 1899

Image credits: Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

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